Why Circular Economy?

  1. Unlocking Economic Opportunities for a Sustainable Lagos

    We could point you to loads of data and estimates to persuade you that current “linear” economic models are creating unprecedented levels of environmental risk. We could also share a mountain of studies that support the view that the transition towards Circular Economies will lead to billions of Euros in new economic opportunities, especially ones that are local.[1]

    But the truth is we want a better Lagos.

Cleaner Environment

Air and water quality in Lagos is poor. Plastics and other waste affect marine habitats and…

Economic Opportunities

Every second person in Nigeria is unemployed or under-employed. The country has…

Positive Social Impact

Circular Economy tools also allow us to work together in new ways. The technical foundations…

Circular Economy tools also allow us to work together in new ways. The technical foundations of the Circular Economy are in engineering, industrial design, and technology, however “circular” products and services change how businesses and markets operate. Sharing and re-use models create deeper relationships with customers and suppliers. Shifts in product ownership also lead to shifts in investment and risk. It is only by working across professional and organizational boundaries that we can develop technical and commercial solutions that meet the needs of Lagosians.

Air and water quality in Lagos is poor. Plastics and other waste affect marine habitats and the health of all those in the Lagos ecosystem. There are high concentrations of heavy metals in groundwater sources that are close to waste sites. Chemical and bacterial pollution is likewise responsible for a growing number of cases of dysentery and cholera in Lagos. Surface water in Lagos is often polluted by sewage.

The air quality of Lagos is ranked among the worst in West Africa. Air pollution caused an estimated 11,200 premature deaths in Lagos in 2018. Children and young adults in Lagos suffer disproportionate levels of heart disease, lung cancer, and pulmonary disease which are linked to dangerous levels of ambient air pollution caused by road transport, generator usage, industrial air pollution, and improper burning and disposal of waste.

 

 

Every second person in Nigeria is unemployed or under-employed. The country has the highest absolute number of people living in extreme poverty in the world.  Foreign investment is decreasing, further constraining job growth. Covid-19 has amplified these challenges by choking the aviation, entertainment, and retail services sectors, leading to the worst recession that Nigeria has experienced in nearly four decades. As the population and labour supply grow, job opportunities are in freefall: more than half of people with A-levels and 40% of people with a first degree are out of work. At the same time prices of raw materials for manufacturing are ballooning making the cost of living more expensive.

These are monumental challenges and Circular Economy tools are one among a wide range of ways to address them.  What makes Circular Economy approaches unique is that they focus on creating markets. They enable us to imagine interconnected solutions: by asking how to create businesses that focus on waste reduction and elimination, we can address urgent environmental challenges while having a positive impact on the economy.